"CRAZY" HEALTH  NUT

The Insanely  Helpful HEALTH Center

 

 

 

HEALTH

SPECIAL REPORT

This is an example of the Health Newsletter. It is primarily pointed to Health Issues, Health Conditions, Diseases and etc. It is about Health in 'general' and could be about any subject or current health news. 

Questions To Ask Before Taking Vitamin and Mineral Supplements


Are you considering taking vitamin or mineral supplements? Do you think you need them? Or that they “can’t hurt” so you may as well take them? Here are some questions to ask before you decide to take them.

 Do I really need them?

First and foremost, nutritional needs should be met by eating a variety of foods as outlined in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. In some cases, vitamin/mineral supplements or fortified foods may be useful for providing nutrients that may otherwise be eaten in less than recommended amounts. If you are already eating the recommended amount of a nutrient, you may not get any further health benefit from taking a supplement. In some cases, supplements and fortified foods may actually cause you to exceed safe levels of intake of nutrients.

(Note that fortified foods are those to which one or more essential nutrients have been added to increase their nutritional value.)

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans makes these recommendations for certain groups of people:
  • People over age 50 should consume vitamin B12 in its crystalline form, that is, from fortified foods (like some fortified breakfast cereals) or as a supplement.

    (Note that older adults often have a reduced ability to absorb vitamin B12 from foods. However, crystalline vitamin B12, the type of vitamin B12 used in supplements and in fortified foods, is much more easily absorbed.)

  • Women of childbearing age who may become pregnant and adolescent females should eat foods that are a source of heme-iron (such as meats) and/or they should eat iron-rich plant foods (like cooked dry beans or spinach) or iron-fortified foods (like fortified cereals) along with a source of vitamin C.

  • Women of childbearing age who may become pregnant and those who are pregnant should consume adequate synthetic folic acid daily (from fortified foods or supplements) in addition to food forms of folate from a varied diet.

  • Older adults, people with dark skin, and people who get insufficient exposure to sunlight should consume extra vitamin D from vitamin D-fortified foods and/or supplements.
It is important to note that vitamin/mineral supplements are not a replacement for a healthful diet. Remember that in addition to vitamins and minerals, foods also contain hundreds of naturally occurring substances that can help protect your health.

 

If this is the type of health information you desire please fill out the Subscribe Form below.

 

 

WE HOPE YOU ENJOYED THE SPECIAL REPORT.


PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR REGULAR DELIVERY OF

MORE SPECIAL HEALTH REPORTS.

SIGN UP NOW

 

 

 

 

 

HEALTH CONDITION SOLUTIONS

HEALTH PROBLEMS